Quote of the day
Before the Devil Knows You're Dead, the film

Supreme Court to consider shield for drug, cigarette firms

Cigarette_warning_label The LA Times reported on January 19, 2008 that the Supreme Court may hear a case in which cigarette companies and drug companies argue that they cannot be sued in state court because the Feds already approved their consumer warnings.

I am reminded in reading this about the joke: "What's the three biggest lies ever told?"

"I'll still love you in the morning. The check is in the mail. I'm from the government and I'm here to help you."

The Supreme Court signaled Friday that it may be ready to shield drug companies and cigarette makers from lawsuits from consumers who say they were not fully warned of the dangers of the product. The justices voted to hear a pair of appeals from industry lawyers that, if upheld, would erect a new barrier to lawsuits. Related -Supreme Court of the United States Related Stories -Ruling limits reach of investor suits -Justices uphold ban on test drugs for the dying -High court to hear TV judge's case -Justices to decide whether murder victims' prior statements are admissible For many years, lawyers for the pharmaceutical industry and cigarette makers have argued that their products should be shielded from suits if they have been approved for use by a federal agency -- such as the Food and Drug Administration -- and a warning label is included. For example, most prescription drugs come with labels that indicate they may be safely used under certain conditions. Consumers are also warned against overdosing or using the drug for other purposes. Industry lawyers say these federally approved warning labels should "preempt" or block lawsuits in state courts from consumers who say they used the drug as prescribed but were badly hurt by it. They say the FDA, and not jurors, should have the role of deciding when drugs can be used safely.

Link: Supreme Court to consider shield for drug, cigarette firms - Los Angeles Times.

Comments

Cheap Cigarettes

again laws against cheap cigarettes, boring

The comments to this entry are closed.